click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20120501
20120531
SHOW
Today 25
Book TV 14
Journal 14
( more )
STATION
CNN 55
CNBC 54
CNNW 54
CSPAN2 46
FOXNEWS 44
CSPAN3 43
CSPAN 40
MSNBCW 40
MSNBC 39
KQED (PBS) 26
WHUT (Howard University Television) 23
WETA 22
KRCB (PBS) 20
WRC 17
KNTV (NBC) 16
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 715
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 715 (some duplicates have been removed)
. and the cold war is not done yet. it's not just the fall of china. it's not just the united states cozying up to japan. but it's going to explode the cold war is going to heat up if you will, in korea. now, remember the last lecture, world war ii? we talked about korea being occupied by japan. once the war is over, the united states and the soviet union decide to divide korea with the united states being in control of the southern part of korea, the soviet union is going to be administering the northern part of korea. eventually, both u.s. and ussr agree that we will withdraw and allow the koreans to have some degree of self-determination. we're going to pull out, soviet union's going to pull out. the koreans will be able to determine their future and their fate. and we both did. the difference is, when we pulled out, we basically took everything with us. when the soviet union pulled out, they left behind a stockpile of weapons. the most modern military technology that they had at the time, and that's the temptation that was going to be used the following summer, 1950, north korea with the us
two times the united states has hosted nato summits were in 1978 and 1999 which, of course, was the 50th anniversary during president clinton's term. as i've said, 61 countries as well as the eu, the united nations and the world bank will be in attendance. they'll be a different grouping, if you will, of countries during the course of the day. as i said, the president will fly to chicago on saturday evening. the first meeting that he'll have on sunday will be with president karzai of afghanistan. obviously, an important meeting because a central focus of the summit will be on afghanistan and afghanistan's future. so the first meeting of the day appropriately is going to be with president karzai of afghanistan. the president will then move into various, a series of nato immediatings. initial meeting with just the nato allies at 28. that evening, on sunday evening, the nato allies will meet at soldier field for a working dinner and that will be leaders plus one adviser. on monday morning, the summit will continue at mccormick place with discussions on afghanistan and this will be a broad
, it david miliband, a former u.k. ambassador to the united states, and my former british colleague at nato. we have widespread support for this report. we are very grateful for their intellectual import and personal support, so that is what i wanted to say. at the order is for us to have a brief conversation, and then we will be happy to take whatever questions you have. thank you. [applause] >> thank you very much for that. first of all, it is important to state that the atlantic council as a council does not take a point of view on anything, because it would just be too hard to get all of the members to agree, but i do think one thing we all agree on is a strong alliance and an enduring alliance, and this report points us in that direction. let me ask probably just two questions, and i will go to the audience right away, and two of the more controversial points, clearly, what you're saying on germany is tough, and it is saying it to a germany where many germans would argue, are we not doing the most important thing we could possibly do for the future of europe right now, which is aiding
for the united states and europe. i might add is also a great pleasure to see the french ambassador here this afternoon. thank you for the support that you gave 2 brookings, and that your predecessors gave to fiona hill, was -- and she would be addressing you from this lectern at the date of this conference, but she was locked into a commitment in beijing. but i want to assure you on behalf of brookings and the united states and europe that this does not represent a strategic pivot on the part of the institution or the center to east asia. it has been our pleasure, and i hope of some contribution to the policy community in partnership with the heinrich boll's foundation to bring the conference to you on an annual basis. and i think it is particularly appropriate that we should have filled with us today. -- phil with us today. he is secretary of state of european affairs and is responsible for u.s. policy toward about 50 countries, as well as three key -- and i would add to that currently, someone challenged international institutions -- the north of montreal organization, the european u
in the time i have been here. the french socialists are not strangers for the united states. they shouldn't be strangers. it has been true that it has been 17 years since the socialists were in power at the presidency. of course, they ran the government about a decade ago when spauo was in power. we have always had a very good relationship with any government that is there in france. i am confident we will have a good relationship with this government in france. we do have to see how this government is going to deal with the issues of the day. it's one thing to be campaigning. it is always something different to be governing. it is not me. it is not my job to predict how this will evolve. i will note that francoi francois hollande campaigned to keep france in the military structure. that was a remarkable statement after nicolas sarkozy to come back into the structure. i think france learned in the libya operation that being integrated in the command structure gives you a voice and say over what happens in the internal affairs of the military operation. that's important. you learn there ar
will be flying to berlin. and a few days later, he will become to the united states to attend the g-8 summit hosted by president barack obama at camp david. and that will also be very important international test that president hollande will be facing very soon in his presidency. >> we're talking about europe's challenge to austerity. independents 202-628-0205. if you're calling from outside the united states today, we hope that you will, 202-628-0184. as always, we'll be taking your tweets, looking at your e-mails and the conversation continues on facebook. our first call comes from spokane, washington. mary on our line for republicans. you're on "the washington journal." go ahead. >> ye >>. >> caller: yeah, here in the united states, we have the same issues you're having over there, but your countries always seem more on the ball to listen to the people. and i was wondering why -- i always suggested how come you guys go to the people and ask their opinion or like i suggested here in the state, there's a lot of people in the united states that are intelligent. they just can't physically wor
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
the gaithersburg book festival we hear from david stew wetter on the third vice president of the united states. his called everyone emperor. he he's introduced by john ashman the founder of the gaithersburg book festival. >> surveys are available at the tend. we hope you enjoy the rest of of your day at the festival. [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the third annual gaithersburg book festival. i'm judd ashman a member of the city council. oop. i hope everyone is all right over there. [inaudible conversations] it is a i have i vibrant diversity that celebrates the support of the cultural arts. we're pleased to bring the event free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. for our consideration and everyone here, i should say, please silence any devices that make any kind of noise at all. in order keep improving the event. we want your feedback. please grab a survey from the table over here. from the info booth it'll be up on the website as of later today. please help us keep improving the event. if there's time for qa please come to the microphone with t
in his speech in prague. the very first summit was held in the united states in 2010. two years later we gathered even more leaders together to focus on the seriousness of the risk of nuclear terrorism, the vulnerability of nuclear material around the world, the international cooperation it will take to secure that material, and prevent it ever coming into the hands of terrorists. >> so it is material as well as existing weaponry? >> and that is right. covers both sets of concerns. >> then you take it one level further. and know-how is involved. >> that is exactly right. >> in the united states, often we are more concerned nowadays -- is the correct phrase a suitcase bomb or something like that? >> improvised nuclear device. >> tell me the phrase again? >> improvised nuclear device. >> what does that mean, in my language? >> it's a pretty crude weapon, but it has probably a lot more material than our own warheads that we have built to go on the front end of missiles and travel reliably 3,000 miles. an improvised nuclear device would be bigger than a suitcase. the smaller you are, the mor
of real significance to the united states. to do that, we will dedicate 80% of our effort to four major cases. right now they are syria, kenya, north/central america and burma. then we'll have another eight to ten places where we can test new approaches or make a welcome difference by just sending the the right person at the right time. so far i think we're gaining traction in each of our major priority engagements. many of you are working in these places, and we realize that we won't know it all or know best about them, so we hope for your support. in syria we are providing a nontraditional surge to empower and unite a fractured, nonviolent opposition. as the secretary announced, that includes providing nonlethal assistance. we are also working with partners to set up an outpost for the internal opposition to coordinate and communicate with the international community. in kenya we are helping to develop plans to insure peaceful and credible elections a year before the vote. incidentally, kenya is one place where we've seen a potential model for broad cooperation and innovation. in nort
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
. and in relation to the united states government, whether it is the clinton administration or bush administration or obama administration, they're probably better understood stood more like francement they're sometime as lined with the united states, sometimes o posed. postly they are just trying to stay out of the way and do their own thing. >> ann bremmer and steve coll when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders:. >> and by bloomberg:. >> from studios in new york city captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: ian bremmer is here president of eurasia group, his new book every nation for itself, winners and losers in a g-zero world t paints a picture in a world in which no single power is able to take be the responsibility of global leadership. larry summers says everyone who cares about our collective future will need to carefully consider this book's impressive arguments. i'm pleased to have ian bremmer back at this table, welcome. >> hi, cha
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
in the region. this supreme leader built an -- towards the united states. so if you are assessing american interests and looking at the region, you have to look at what iran's behave hear been towards american interests over time. i can say this, actually, even though you're asking me to assume a different persona, back in the 1990s when i was a negotiator in the middle east, we were constantly contending with iranian-inspired efforts to subvert the peace process through acts of terror. so there's a history here of being hofstile towards american interests. we have seen different iranian leaderships 24r50e69 leaderships at least in the forms of their presidents, talking about a dialogue of civilizations and the possibilities of trying to find ways of building bridges between the two sides. he was clearly not able to deliver very much. if anything at all. so i think we have to look at iran through a lens of hostility and threats. i think we also have to look at iran through a lens that, their behave hear, from time to time, been adjusted tactical. not strategically but tactically when, in f
in two decades, we're looking at what it means for the united states. i'm wolf blitzer, you're still in "the situation room." the vice president joe biden said over the weekend he's fine with gay marriage and arnie duncan says he believes gay and lesbians should be allowed to marry. putting him at odds with the president of the united states. jessica yellin is working the story for us. jessica, causing quite an uproar there, what's going on? >> reporter: this is clearly an unwelcome topic for a white house that pronounces to make all decisions based on principle not on politics. it certainly looks as if the vice president supports gay marriage. >> who do you love? the president sets the policy. i am absolutely comfortable that the fact that men marrying wo i and women marrying women, are entitled to all the civil rights and the civil liberties. >> reporter: but the president is vague. >> my feelings about this are constantly evolving. i struggle with this. >> reporter: this is a flash point election. to argue biden's comments weren't new. >> i think they were entirely consistent with
the veto word is not used, also not used in the constitution of the united states but no one doubts the president has it. we have the ability to do it to the language that is there. that will become a bit more clear as we come forward. >> thank you, chairman kerry. i'm very glad that we're having this in today and i appreciate all of you for being here. senator webb and i sent chairman kerry and ranking member luber a letter back in april urging we move forward to consideration of law of the sea treaty and i'm grateful to your broad and searching and supportive testimony here today. when i was brand-new to the senate, one of the earlier meetings i took was with the then outgoing chief of naval operations. when i asked him what is the single most important thing we can do to help the navy over the next decade, he said without hesitation, ratify the law of the sea treaty. i was taken aback by the. given other budget priorities, operational issues, as it turned out admiral estimation of the importance of this issue is shared i'm stomach every living chief of naval operations not to men
the united states government was drafting the moral act and the homestead act of 1862 if they ever thought about the possibility of counter fit operations being established in the midwest and northern great plains.counterfit operati established in the midwest and northern great plains. and if so what were their plans in preventing such an event. >> i found no record of that being a concern it for tfor they department, which particularly in 1862 was, if you read samson chase's, the secretary treasury's diary, it becomes clear that he was running an endless effort simply to fund the next day's operations. or argue bring the past weably operations. day after day he comes in to his office to find million of dollars of unpaid bills on his desk and he'll complain about the fact that he has no idea how to pay them. and if they had been paid in cou counterfeit money, i think that would have been fine with him. most of the republican party was strongly opposed to the idea of fiat money, greenback money, to begin with. chase and lincoln were really driven to the wall by the fact that they had no alt
remember when wiki leex came out in the united states, right. >> rose: yes, i remember. >> i was in the emirates at the time and i was seated next to a minister. >> rose: you hang out in the emirates but i don't. >> i don't hang out in the emirates, that's not truement i was there for the weekend. >> rose: for a conference or something. >> some god forsakeen conference and i was sitting next to some minister from qatar without said to me that we believed that we actually leaked wiki leaks ourselves because it made us look so good. >> rose: there were those kinds of conversations in which diplomats were heard, unknowing to themselves, that they might be later seen and heard to everybody who could go on the internet saying good thing-- things and positive things and things that were in the interest of good things. >> indeed. and look, what did it reflect. what we learned from wikileaks, we learned that karzai was corruption. we learned that christina kirchner in arg stin-- argentina was considered by hillary clinton was considered to be emotionally unstable, shocking, right, sh
is that the united states as a individual nation and nato collectively as an alliance have to do long-term thinking about where it. wants to be in ten or eight years time. and outline the type of missions it envisions undertaking in the future and what capabilities will be required to undertake the missions. and kind of set some -- identify some kind of priority areas for the alliance knowing that most allies simply aren't going to be able to do everything every time. not every ally will be able to do everything from peace keeping to high intensity combat. we have a number of al thrice have reached that point and are starting to specialize and develop these capabilities if it's not coordinated you could end up with everybody. it's like a pot luck dinner. you don't have any main course when everybody brings desert. the summit going to try to start the alliance on the healthier course. but it's also going to start first and foremost with delivering on some commitments made in lisbon. you might remember, the alliance watched the lisbon critical caimentn'ts commitment. where the alliance identified ten
are not strangers for the united states. it has been 17 years since the socialists have been in power and had the presidency. they ran the government a decade ago. we have always had a good relationship with any government that is there in france. i am confident we will have a good relationship with the government in france. we have to see how this government is going to deal with the issues of the day. i will keep france integrated in command structure -- he will keep france integrated into the command structure. that was a remarkable decision by sarkozy. the integrated in the command structure gives you a voice and a say over what happens in internal affairs of the military operation. it is important. there are benefits from being fully integrated. i would suspect this is a benefit that will remain even if there may be differences of degree as policies go on. that is what elections are all about, to enable the people to express themselves and vote in new governments who will have to decide how they want to pursue policies. on the big foreign policy issues, i expect more continuity. >> he ta
book, "crusade 2.0", which is about islamic phobia and its effects in the united states, studied by city life, great press. and instead of reading from the book, i thought it was just a presentation for you and for part. the four parts are going to be a visit, a palm, and e-mail and then finally a political ad. let's start with this. a couple weeks ago i went to new york city have visited park 51, an interesting islamic cultural center. and there he saw the different programs they have available. they teach error back, calligraphy. they have a course on capillary, a brazilian martial art. it was a fascinating, it occurs to me, you might not know what i'm talking about because you might not recognize part 51, the action name part 51 because you might be more familiar with the name that was used in the media to describe park 51, which is of course the ground zero mosque. it was two years ago that this islamic cultural center, not a mosque in knoxville is located at ground zero, but several blocks away became the focus of the great controversy. i don't know if you remember that two
to pass and send the message to the world that the united states senate supports the stated policy of our government in this critical issue. nobody wants iran to be able to move forward and attain nuclear capacity, and i am -- i'd be very concerned about moving forward on this language as it currently appears to me to be stated. mr. reid: is there an objection by either senator kyl or senator -- mr. kyl: yes, mr. president, for the reasons noted, i would hope that we could work our colleagues to fix the problem here. until we do i would have to object. the presiding officer: objection is heard. mr. reid: mr. president, this is sump a such an interesting conversation on the floor. i didn't have the papers. i don't blame nigh friend infrastructure arizona for not having the dowvment i don't blame nigh friend from missouri for only having a half-hour to look at this. this thing was given to the republican leader yesterday in midday. all right? now, mr. president, the language they're objecting to was in the base bill. so unless they didn't read the base bill, we have a problem here. now, the
states. hispanic children are at the highest level of poverty in the history of the united states. i think the challenge is not how to bring them over to immigration reform or dialogue. just to make sure the latino community knows these facts and understands the failure of president obama. >> i agree with you there is a lot of ammunition. these comments about self deportation have indicated to some in the community he does not have respect for them. go to south texas and talk to latino ranch and farm owners and small businesses and members of the hispanic community. they are hard asses because they are the first to feel the adverse affect. cartels are shooting at them. are competing for jobs. there are a lot of reasons why they are hard asses but they do want to know the presidential candidate has respect for the community and in recognition this is not all a mexican problem. half the people here illegally came from hong kong the, nigeria on a visa and overstating it. the fact that all the people from central america are unworthy is a real problem. >> thank you. >> we will get behind
incomes were growing more equal in the united states and the great divergence which is a period when incomes were growing more unequal. the pattern towards greater income equality from 34 to 79 was so pronounced that a whole economic theory was built around the idea that this is simply what happened in an advanced industrial economy after the disruption of industrialization in the late 19th and early 20th century, this was theorized you would expect to see a steadily, a move towards tedly more equal -- steadily more equal income. simon -- [inaudible] who formulated this theory essentially said -- he didn't put it quite this way -- but he essentially said it was the mark of a civilized nation that incomes had become more equal. but as you can see, we started becoming uncivilized in 1979. here you see that the trend, the income share of the top 1% which has doubled since 1979 is growing faster the higher up the income scale you go. so it's really being driven by the richest of the rich. when i say income share, i mean the the percentage of the nation's collective income that is going t
to north korea's missile program, missiles that are targeted to the united states. in light of that, what is your view of the administration's position to lift export controls to china? on lethal weapons? >> you know, one of the -- it is conventional wisdom, but it is very wrong. the conventional wisdom is a china that looks hundreds of years in the future, they have thousands of years of history. china knows, they are thinking three moves ahead of us on the chessboard. if that's true, why do they continue to prop up a north korean regime? why would you want to prop up a regime that has 150,000 or 200,000 people starving to death? why would you want one that continues? it's only cash is nuclear weapons, and continuing to not only move forward but exporting those kinds of technologies into the most volatile parts of the world. the chinese leader was here in town, and there were four or five of us. i said why? why do you continue to prop up the regime? it is a blot on the reputation of your government. and his answer was -- and i'm not making this up. chinese translator, senator mccain is w
information on the breaking news story, the united states with the help of allies foils a terrorist plot to bomb an air liner and an in-depth look at the key issues in the 2012 presidential election and president obama's report card on i am gags. plus, exactly six months from now, a new polling shows an incredibly tight race and the romney and obama campaign confront a pair of tough questions. >> we start with dramatic breaking use. new information coming in by the minute on a new terror plot foiled by the united states and its allies. it is said to involve putting a suicide bomber aboard an air liner. it was foiled and the u.s. recovered and is now studying the explosive device. let's bring in fran townsend who was president bush's homeland security advisor and also with us tom fuentes. fran, i want to go to you first. from your sources with he are hearing that this was an upgrade if you will. do you remember the underwear bomber, that this was a way to upgrade the technology into an ie d and explosive device. what do you know? >> just speaking to a senior administration official t
down what europe's crisis means for the united states, christine romans, host of "your bottom line" and christie freeland, editor for thomsons reuters digital. today they fired french president nicolas sarkozy. he will be replaced by socialist francois hollande. sarkozy becomes the highest profile european leader ousted during the region's economic crisis. cnn's senior european correspondent jim bittermann joins us live from paris. jim? >> reporter: you know how they say you should have been here a day ago. you should have been here an hour and 15 minutes ago. this place was packed with sar k cozy supporters thinking he had a chance to win and he didn't win. he conceded defeat almost immediately when the numbers came from the television networks across the country, the exit polls. here is a little bit of the concession speech he gave to the followers here. >> translator: trance hfrance h republic, a new president, this is a choice. francois hollande is the president of france and must be respected. >> reporter: and while the crowd here is thinning out, one of the things that sarkoz
president of the united states of america. the president sets the policy. i am absolutely comfortable with the fact that men marrying men, women marrying women and heterosexual -- men and women marrying all are entitled to the same exact rights, all the civil rights, all the civil liberties and, quite frankly, i don't see much of a distinction beyond that. >> those words sparked a quick response, not from republicans, but from the president's own campaign. what the vp said that all married couples should have the same legal rights is precisely potus' position. that's exactly what david axelrod tweeted, so the vice president gets out in front of his boss on an issue that on the ballot tuesday in north carolina, a presidential battleground state. a biden gaffe or is it a trial balloon? the answer depends on who you ask, and we'll get much more into this debate coming up in moments right here on cnn. meantime, there's a major shift in the halls of power for a key u.s. ally. france's new president is a socialist. francois hollande beat conservative incumbent nicolas sarkozy in sunday's ru
want to see that as a mandate for the next president of the united states to push the congress to pass that kind of a balanced budget amendment out of the house and send to the state for ratification. that's the only way we can get to a point to get this country back on the fiscal track again. >> next call, buffalo, new york, debbie, independent line. >> caller: how you doing this morning? >> good morning, debbie. >> caller: i have two questions. one has to do with the import export bank owned by the clintons. you people just gave them $140 billion and you're complaining about jpmorgan and $2 billion? >> so what about the ex and imbank? >> i voted against the export/import bank because of some of the things i think were in the tone of your message, debbie. we have to start making decisions about what this federal government has to do versus what the government might have chose ton do in better economic times. along the way, the house of representatives has seen a growing core of constitutional and fiskcal conservatives lookig for places to put up a vote and send a message say weg can g
, it's vitaly important. this had political significance not just here in the united states but, also within afghanistan. you know, being able to come to president karzai, sign this agreement, show the afghan people that the united states is going to, you know, remain engaged in the region and, also send a compelling message to other neighbors who have metalled in afghan affairs but pakistan, you know, next door, that the united states is going to be hear and it's going to try to continue to help afghanistanyou know, next door, that the united states is going to be hear and it's going to try to continue to help afghanistan. >> thank you p.j. crawley forker assistant of state for public affairs. the president's announced trip comes four days before he officially kicks off his re-election campaign. here to discuss the strategic interest of the trip and, perhaps, a little bit of politics, too, is michael knott, the assistant secretary of defense for global strategic affairs in the obama administration now and then a prevention-off of public policy, form
to blow up a passenger jet bound for the united states. a u.s. counter terrorism official tells cnn the explosive device is similar to the one used by the would-be underwear bomber. just like that bomb, there one did not contain metal, which raises real questions about whether it could have gotten passed airport security. as of yet, the person who had developed that bomb had not yet bought a ticket. here's defense secretary, leon panetta. >> what this incident makes clear is that this country has to continue to remain vigilant against those that would seek to attack this country and we will do everything necessary to keep america safe. >> fran townsend is cnn's national security contributor, a member of both the dhs and cia external advisory boards. chad sweet is a former dhs and cia official, also the cofounder of the chertoff group, a global security firm. good to see both of you. fran, i know you've been reporting on this throughout the day. we're hearing now that there could have been this bomb and other bombs, perhaps. how close of a call was this? >> you know, the official i s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 715 (some duplicates have been removed)